Jnana Yajna 36

Jnana Yajna 36

Year & Dates:

January 11, 1958 to February 05, 1958

Yajna Topic:

Atma Bodha

Place:

Kolkata, India.

When we welcome a new year, we usher in the resolve for higher aspirations. With that enthusiastic spirit, opening 1958 with a Jnana Yajna by Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda was Kolkata’s great fortune. It was the third Yajna in the city; Pujya Gurudev had taught the poetic, profound Atma Bodha in the early morning classes in many places including Kolkata, but this was the first Yajna where Atma Bodha was going to be elaborated during the two-hour evening primetime. 

Pujya Gurudev was received ceremonially at 6:30 pm on January 11, 1958. After the Om flag was unfurled and hoisted, He was escorted with exuberant chanting of the Mahamantra in a graceful procession onto an aesthetically decorated stage. The beginning was spectacular, and the next twelve days of discourses were spell-binding with the rich similes of Atma Bodha.

Master of Circumstances

The 36th Jnana Yajna at Kolkata had also the twist of the unexpected. On the calm evening of December 23rd, just the day before the planned Havana, the devoted Akhanda Kirtan of “Hare Rama” was interrupted by the cries of “Fire, Fire!” In a matter of just five minutes, the huge tent with all the expensive idols and equipment was reduced to ashes by a raging inferno. Hearing about that fearsome blaze, Pujya Gurudev remarked with His characteristic composure: “Agni Bhagavan decided not to wait for the Havana tomorrow to visit us. Do you not discern His Protecting Hand in the fire breaking out at 5:30 pm. and not at 6:30 pm.?” Indeed, if the fire had broken out just an hour later during the discourse, it would have ended in a tragic disaster. It was a sheer miracle that no life was lost.

Personifying equipoise, Pujya Gurudev reassured the shaken people and continued His Jnana Yajna at the Gujarati Bala Mandir for the next few days. Guided by His unshakable strength, the Kolkata Yajna Committee re-erected a new, bigger tent on the very same fire-ravaged land. The Yajna was a roaring success as the program was improvised. Instead of a scheduled trip to the Triveni Sangam, a steamer trip to the Ganga Sagar Island was scenic and memorable; the small snags dissolved in the sheer bliss of Pujya Gurudev’s Presence. From February 3, 1958, the Havana inside that new pandal and Akhanda Kirtan commenced with fervor and faith. When the final 68th verse was explained on February 5th and the Ganga waters were sprinkled by Pujya Gurudev on the blessed audience of Kolkata, the spiritual fulfillment felt was beyond words. 

The unforgettable Jnana Yajna ended when the Om flag was unfurled. It had been flying high, untouched by the hungry flames, symbolizing the unscathed Atma that Pujya Gurudev extolled.

Photo Gallery

“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

In cooking food, items such as vegetables, rice, spices, etc., are “contributory” causes; but by themselves they can never constitute food. Fire alone can accomplish the cooking; fire is the direct cause. Similarly, the performance of rituals, the offering of gifts, the practice of austerities, control of the mind, the study of the scriptures, the use of the discriminative intellect are all, no doubt, helpful factors which aid one’s spiritual growth, but they do not by themselves directly lead one to liberation. Liberation is possible only when the true Knowledge of our own existence is realized, or the glory of our Self rediscovered.

From Atma Bodha Book

An Allegory of Spiritual Awakening

Text to be update


Jnana Yajna 35

Jnana Yajna 35

Year & Dates:

December 01, 1957 to December 22, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Kenopanishad

Place:

Mumbai (Bombay), India.

Though the nearby city of Pune had the great honor of being the site for Pujya Gurudev’s first Jnana Yajna, Mumbai(then Bombay) had to wait for about six years. Only in December 1957, could Mumbai host its first Upanishad Jnana Yajna by Pujya Gurudev. The well-known Kishinchand College (K.C.College) in Mumbai offered its terrace as the happy venue. Drawing attention to how Vedanta had withstood onslaughts because of its adaptability and resilience, Pujya Gurudev was emphatic that Vedanta was for all. His systematic 5-day introductory discourses prepared the Mumbai audience for the subtle import of Kenopanishad. His hourly talks every morning on Atma Bodha in Vijay Mahal embellished the understanding of serious seekers. As had become His practice, Pujya Gurudev set aside time to address the young generation of college students who needed the crucial know-how to harmonize Science and Religion.

Mankind, Religion and Science

In a memorable talk at Poddar College on December 25, 1957, Pujya Gurudev presented a thought-provoking analogy. Comparing mankind to an old man, religion to a long-standing, faithful spouse, and science to a young, attractive maiden, Pujya Gurudev showcased the predicament of mankind. With science racing ahead and mankind abandoning the loyal support of religion, Pujya Gurudev pinpointed how mankind was lost in the middle. 

Every yajna of Pujya Gurudev was aimed at rejuvenating religion and helping mankind understand its value in the presence of advancing science. In Mumbai too, the special lectures at colleges, the Upanishad discourses, kirtans, meditation sessions, and the sacred Ganga prokshan (sprinkling) affirmed how the people of a busy city could tap into the blessings of religion.

The yatra to Alandi near Pune was a sacred experience. Aspirants could bask in the peace of Sant Jnaneshwar’s samadhi and complete the Avabhruta Snana in the Indriyani river. The satsang with Pujya Gurudev under a banyan tree transported all to the Vedic times. After that, when each seeker meditated for half an hour in seclusion, the significance of the scriptures came into focus. Pujya Gurudev aimed to empower mankind with a clear understanding of both religion and science.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

A child, trying to catch the head of its own shadow, moves forward and forward, but at each leap the goal too moves as far away from it as before; until at last it falls off the verandah onto the court-yard!! So too man seeking a permanent Joy among the impermanent things, falls off into his grave!!Alas!!

That deer which knows that the source of the Musk Secret is within itself, shall no more run about and die away in futile and meaningless exhaustion. The Man who has recognized the Truth that the source of All Joy is within himself will no more strive and struggle in the meaningless dust and fume, hustle and bustle, noise and nuisance of the broadways. To him life becomes a hilarious, melodramatic scene, and not a serious tearful tragedy of his own impotence and failures!

From Kenopanishad Book

Remedy for an Unhappy Mind!

Text to be update


Jnana Yajna 34

Jnana Yajna 34

Year & Dates:

November 03, 1957 to November 23, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Shrimad Bhagavad Gita- Chapter 3

Place:

Allahabad (Prayagraj), India.

Acclaimed as a great place of pilgrimage near the holy confluence of the clear waters of the Ganga, the green waters of the Jamuna, and the mythological river Sarasvati, Prayagraj brings to mind the pristine flow of Sanatana Dharma. However, religion had become stagnant ritualism in the 1950s, and Prayagraj needed a dynamic boost. 

Six years and 33 Jnana Yajnas after Pujya Gurudev flagged off the Vedantic Renaissance, He arrived at Prayagraj. Unmindful of His own burning fever and a sore throat, Pujya Gurudev quenched the spiritual thirst of an audience who craved for more after hearing His incomparable explanations of the third chapter of Bhagavad Gita. All roads lead to wherever He was, to listen, learn, and soak in the spiritual abundance of His teachings. Every association, club, society, and organization vied with one another to invite Him and host His talks.

A Confluence of Wisdom, Words, and Worship

Invited by the Allahabad Students Union, Pujya Gurudev addressed the students in a set of powerful discourses titled, “Your life is yours. Make it or mar it.” Initial skepticism from the youth on the first day rapidly turned into admiration and attention. Word spread and attendance peaked. Chairs were pushed farther back making place for more students to sit on carpets. But that too wasn’t enough. Students stood in the verandah and the upper gallery, grabbing every inch of space and hanging on to each word that Pujya Gurudev uttered. 

An astute Teacher that He was, Pujya Gurudev announced a prize of Re.100 for the best essay written on ‘Religion and its place in Modern Life.’ The sight of hundreds of students taking notes at a fiery pace was proof of the revival of Sanatana Dharma among the motivated youth.

In several of His initial Jnana Yajnas, Pujya Gurudev had incorporated the feature of essay contests. This encouraged avid listeners and seekers to internalize and apply the wisdom of the scriptures in their own lives. The winners were given a small cash prize and the best essay was published in earlier editions of Tyagi.

Besides the words to remember, the spirited kirtans on boats at the Triveni Sangam, the meaningful satsang on the banks of Ganga, and the sincere worship at Shivkuti temples –  the people of Prayagraj marveled at and adored the ways Pujya Gurudev refreshed their spiritual perspective.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

The philosophy of Geeta does not suggest even in its implications any kind of running away from the world of sense-objects. Krishna’s creed is to be lived here and now among one’s situations in life and in this very world, and is to be experienced through our sacred vehicles of the body, mind and intellect. The only insistence is that on all occasions a wise man should be a master of the vehicles and not a helpless victim of these matter envelopments. And the secret of this mastery in life is to live free from the tyrannies of attachments and aversions.

From Tyagi Magazine

Working for Recognition?

Text to be update


Jnana Yajna 33

Jnana Yajna 33

Year & Dates:

October 08, 1957 to October 29, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Ishavasya Upanishad

Place:

Hyderabad, India.

Only ten months before, just as 1957 was ushered in, thousands had thronged the Andhra Yuvathi Mandali, Barkatpura in Hyderabad. They had tasted the sweet devotion and recognized the field and the Knowing Principle that Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda had presented through the Gita Jnana Yajna of chapters 12 and 13. With their spiritual appetite kindled, they assembled again on October 8, 1957 at  6 pm. After Col. K. N. Waghray, President of the Yajna Committee, hoisted the Om flag, he began, “Swami Chinmayanandaji has chosen Ishavasya Upanishad as the theme of His discourse this time. The purpose of this Upanishad is to teach the essential unity of God and this world.”

Selfless, Spiritual Outlook

Pujya Gurudev’s choice was timely since spiritual and material integration of the modern man was the need of the hour, in the turbulent 1950s, especially in India; only the enduring wisdom of the Upanishads could offer a comprehensive and lasting solution. Shri Bhimsen Sachar, the Governor of Andhra Pradesh, who inaugurated the yajna and unveiled the portrait of Adi Shankaracharya, appealed for a changed outlook based on scriptural understanding. In His opening discourse, Pujya Gurudev was forthright and clear: “Turning to God in darkness is not true religion, and it would only amount to temporary adjustment and compromise. True religion means a correct understanding of the questions like ‘Who am I? From where have I come? And what is the purpose of life?’” 

To build that understanding, Pujya Gurudev explained, in His morning sessions, the path to  Self-Awareness using the succinct verses of Atma Bodha written by Adi Shankaracharya. Then, His discourses in the evening on the pithy 18 verses of the Ishavasya Upanishad made the audience review the world in a different, divine light. The majestic vision that Pujya Gurudev inspired in the audience was evident in the other limbs of the Jnana Yajna – the soulful Akhanda Kirtan, the devout Maha Mrtyunjaya Homa, the purifying sprinkling of Ganga waters, as well as the sacred bath and prayers at the Vemulawada Uma Maheshwara temple 130 miles from Hyderabad. Whether in the yajnashala or through His lectures to students of Osmania University, Pujya Gurudev unceasingly steered everyone to look out with a unifying Upanishadic lens and make work a selfless offering.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

The Upanishads have glorified sweat and toil to the highest pinnacles of recognition. ‘Dignity of Labour’ is nowhere so openly declared and religiously glorified as in the Hindu scriptures. Dedicated and noble work alone can polish the animal-man to a state of true cultural and right discipline. To those who know what it is, work is not a slavery or a drudgery but it is the Chutney of life. But when a dissipated and demoralized generation have in their misconstrued enthusiasm fallen off their track into a disastrous wreckage, they tumble down into the pits of “more wages and less hours”!! To them even “no work and all money” would still be only a state of terrible and agonizing discontentment!! Man is not born to revel in idleness.

From Ishavasya Upanishad Book

You are Searching in the Wrong Place!

As we unravel the mysteries of consciousness and reality, we confront a fundamental question: are we searching in the wrong place? In this thought-provoking discourse, learn how to transcend worldly distractions and turn your attention towards the ultimate reality, Paramatma. Prepare to shift your perspective and embark on a quest for deeper understanding and inner awakening.


Jnana Yajna 32

Jnana Yajna 32

Year & Dates:

September 01, 1957 to October 01, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Bhagavad Gita- Chapter 2

Place:

Thrissur, India.

The excitement was building up in the sprawling maidan (open grounds) before the famous Vadakkunnathan Temple of Thrissur, the cultural capital of Kerala. People of all ages, backgrounds, and faiths had convened well before 5p.m on that wondrous evening of September 1, 1957. Soon, the resonant melodies of Panchavaadya and Naadaswara filled the air as royally decorated elephants moved rhythmically to divine bhajans. Fireworks lit up the sky in sparkling joy. And, in the orange hue of the evening, all eyes were fixed on the tall figure standing inside a bedecked convertible. A youth during his student days, beloved to Thrissur as “Balan,” had arrived as the glowing and eminent Swami Chinmayananda for a much-awaited Gita Jnana Yajna.

Victory, Open to All

The Governor of Kerala, Sri Ramakrishna Rao, unfurled the Om flag and inaugurated the yajna. In the yajnashala graced by the portrait of Swami Tapovanam and the divine idol of Sri Krishna, a mellow prayer song, “Akhilanda Mandalam,” which was Pujya Gurudev’s favorite, sounded the perfect starting note. The song’s refrain, “Vijayikka nin thiru Namangal Paadi – Singing Your Great Names, May we achieve victory” was meaningfully apt. Pujya Gurudev’s introduction about “Vedanta, the Philosophy of Life” and Shrimad Bhagavad Gita roused the audience. Thereafter, everyday, from 6-8p.m, He transported all into the paradise of the enlightening second chapter. To the Christians who attended regularly in large numbers, he welcomed them without distinction saying, “Gita is not meant for a particular caste or creed ; it is meant for Man. It points out the way to Man, how to live his best, individually, as well as a society or as a nation.” 

The Atma Bodha classes in the early mornings, a 5-day Akhanda Kirtan from Sep.18, and a four-day Gita Homa from Sep.19 culminating in a huge procession with the Ganga waters – Thrissur was awash with spiritual fervor. Pujya Gurudev eloquently unfolded Sankhya Yoga and answered questions for two days after concluding His discourses. The Avabhrta Snaana at the scenic Sri Rama Temple at Triprayar was an unforgettable blessing. Beholding at night that illuminated temple beside the flooded river that carried hundreds of lamps lit on paper boats, devotees were enveloped in that sacred radiance. Thrissur was immersed in a mighty flow of Jnana, Karma, and Bhakti, transformed by Pujya Gurudev’s astounding Gita Jnana Yajna.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

Death grins only at those who have no understanding, and it has no pain for those who understand its implications and working. Just as changing dress is no pain to the body, so too when the dweller in the body leaves the envelope there is no pain possible; and by undressing it does not mean that there after we are ever to live naked. So too, this embodied Self ere long discovers and appropriate equipment from which to function so as to earn for itself new sets of experiences. Evolution and change are all for the mind and intellect and not for the Self. The Self is perfect and changeless, and needs no evolution in Itself.

From Tyagi Magazine

Even this will pass away!

Explore the profound wisdom of the Bhagavad Gita as it reveals the transient nature of life’s experiences. Learn to navigate the highs and lows, knowing that every joy and sorrow is fleeting, and discover the enduring truth that lies beyond them.


Jnana Yajna 31

Jnana Yajna 31

Year & Dates:

July 07, 1957 to August 07, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Kathopanishad

Place:

Chennai, India.

A busy road in the middle of a business district in Chennai paused to ponder when Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda brought the heartwarming Kathopanishad to town. Chennai’s fifth Jnana Yajna, the boon of Kathopanishad materialized in a large pandal (tent) erected right on Mount Road (now Anna Salai). The thousands who were thirsting to hear the commanding voice of Pujya Gurudev again were delighted. With the Om flag flying high, Pujya Gurudev signaled study time: “The Upanishads are original sources of the knowledge of life given to us by the immortal seers and sages. Kathopanishad is the most sublime of them all for it contains in itself the poetic fervor and philosophic alertness of our forefathers.”

Tasting Sannyas after Study

From July 7th, the involved audience hung onto every word of Pujya Gurudev’s -they waited with Nachiketa, rejected distractions offered by the world, and wanted only That Knowledge that outlasted death. 

One notable experience that Pujya Gurudev had incorporated from the earliest yajnas was what He called “returnable sannyas.” He took four hundred eager seekers of Chennai on an unforgettable journey of a ‘one-day-sannyas’ starting at 5 pm the evening of August 3, 1957. Fervent chanting, bhajans, a joyous dip in the sacred Kollidam river, and the blissful Darshan of Lord Shiva as Nataraja and Lord Vishnu as Govindaraj at Chidambaram – divinity pervaded every minute. Pujya Gurudev then took them to Ramalinga Jothi, a great Tamil saint’s samadhi sthal which had a Tamil inscription of “Be ever hungry, ever in solitude, and ever vigilant.” To elevate Bhakti and Jnana through silent Japa Yoga, Pujya Gurudev guided them to the meditative Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry before returning to Chennai. A whirlwind visit in temporary orange was the briefest glimpse through which Pujya Gurudev indicated what Nachiketa gained forever in Kathopanishad.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

Gloriously our twenty-four-hour Sanyas has concluded. It helped us realize the joyous strength in unity and charming freedom in renunciation. It plunged us first into the sacred waters of the river Colroon for external cleanliness and then for internal purity made us taste Bhakti Rasa at the holy temple of Chidambaram, Jnana Rasa at Vadalur and finally had fixed us in Yoga at Aurobindo Ashram. Our minds and intellects fused and established us in Supreme Bliss.

Indeed this Twenty-four-hour Sanyas treatment, given by the mighty Bishak (Doctor) in Swami Chinmayananda, was so complete that we experienced everything that a true Sanyasin would realize in a period of years.

From Tyagi Magazine

This question whether there is experience after death or not is not one which belongs to the Realm of the Mind and the Intellect. These instruments of feeling and knowing do, at their best, give us only some vague directions pointing towards a World of Knowledge that actually lies spread out beyond their own frontiers. In order to travel towards that Land of Pune Knowledge the ordinary mortal, however intellectual and sensitive he may be, has not the necessary vehicle. It is only the great Masters of renunciation and wisdom who have specially developed their intuitive faculty that can at will take one into these Realms Beyond.

From Kathopanishad Yajna Prasad

Say No to Yourself!

Contemplate on the fundamental choice between the path of righteousness (Shreya) and the path of immediate pleasure (Preya), and learn how refusing to compromise on higher values leads to lasting fulfillment and spiritual growth.


Jnana Yajna 30

Jnana Yajna 30

Year & Dates:

May 01, 1957 to May 31, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Mundakopanishad

Place:

Bengaluru, India.

“The Upanishad Jnana Yajna  is a determined pilgrimage to Truth,” said Sri. A.G. Ramachandra Rao, Ex.Education Minister, Mysore State, and President of the Upanishad Jnana Yajna Committee as he welcomed an exuberant, elite audience of over three thousand on May 1, 1957 at City Institute Premises, Chamarajpet. His Highness Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar, the Maharaja and Governor of Mysore, in his inaugural address, expressed: “I have great pleasure in inaugurating this Jnana Yajna, the Great Ritual of spreading enlightenment and happiness, contentment, goodness, and contact with the True (Santosha, Santripti, Sadaachaara, and Satsanga) which are announced by Swamiji to be the aims of his great Mission. Let us pray and hope that the Flame of Truth that is now lit up will be ever kept burning.”

All-day, Always Spiritual Stamina

“The same old Chinmaya minus the beard,” Pujya Gurudev introduced Himself with His charming smile. He advised: “A revival of the Upanishad studies would at this moment give us the necessary stamina to keep us within the pattern of the Hindu thoughts – in short will give our momentous progress a direction and glorious goal.”

For that Supreme Goal to be within everyone’s reach, Pujya Gurudev made Himself available all through the day. His typical day was a dynamic flow of knowledge. Starting at 5 am until 6:30 am, He conducted classes for the seekers in National College, Bengaluru, on the minor works of Shri Aadi Shankara. From 7:30 – 10 am, He taught Atma Bodha at the Yajnashala pandal. Before His evening discourses on Mundakopanishad, He planned the upcoming yajnas and attended meetings, also making time for the unending questions from the crowd that always followed Him. The QA sessions sometimes lasted until midnight! Amazingly, Pujya Gurudev came to every session and met each devotee with His characteristic electrifying energy, clarity, attention, boundless compassion, and love. Needless to say, the Knowledge of all branches of knowledge that Mundakopanishad enshrined shone bright and lustrous in that triumphant Jnana Yajna.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

In Vedanta, this idea is explained by means of an analogy of a piece of cloth in which some patterns and forms are woven in by the same thread as of the cloth. So long as the cloth is observed as such, the names and forms represented in it are true and real. But when we draw out the thread we find that all the names and forms merge themselves to form a bundle of threads; and if the threads are unwound, nothing remains but a quantity of cotton. In the final analysis, the names and forms on the piece of cloth, including the very cloth-piece, were nothing but a seeming transformation of the cotton-stuff.

Removing all the cotton, neither the cloth nor the pattern can remain. In cotton it exists, out of cotton it has come and into cotton alone can it merge back. Similarly the Pure Consciousness, the Eternal Pure Wisdom. Is That Knowledge, ‘knowing which every other knowledge becomes known’; out of this Absolute Knowledge has all the world of names and forms emerged, and in it they exist and into it they merge back.

From Mundakopanishad Yajna Prasad

An Allegory of Spiritual Awakening

Here we have the symbolic tale of the two birds, one of the most famous allegories of Mundakopanishad. These two birds represent the dual nature of the individual self and the eternal consciousness, let’s discover how redirecting focus from worldly pursuits to spiritual contemplation leads to inner tranquility and bliss.


Jnana Yajna 29

Jnana Yajna 29

Year & Dates:

March 15, 1957 to April 04, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Vivekachudamani

Place:

Ernakulam, India.

To a Realized Sage, the whole world is home. Still, His birthplace is significant because of the associated glory. Such is the honor of Ernakulam, the home of Balakrishna Menon who became the revered Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda. On March 15,1957, when the 29th Jnana Yajna commenced in Ernakulam, the audience was filled with joyful pride about their cherished son of the soil. That yajna on  Vivekachudamani was the first yajna of Pujya Gurudev’s in Ernakulam. Adi Shankara’s crest-jewel text was going to be taught in a royal setting, on the grounds of the Ernakulam Residential Palace.

Doubly Blessed Backwaters

Excitement ran high inside and outside the splendidly decked Palace since His Highness, the Maharaja of Cochin was going to inaugurate the yajna. The meeting of Pujya Gurudev and the royal head moved and thrilled those who witnessed it; the simple and dignified Maharaja prostrated as soon as he saw Pujya Gurudev, and Pujya Gurudev too prostrated in utter humility. Their mutual love and regard for each other and for Vedanta overwhelmed everyone. 

Before a beautiful portrait of Shree Adi Sankaracharya, Pujya Gurudev commenced the discourses on Vivekachudamani in that exemplary venue set amid the shimmering backwaters of the Arabian Sea on the West, the Palace on the East, and the swaying rows of coconut palm trees on the North and the South. He stressed on the importance of distinguishing between the permanent and the impermanent. He urged all seekers to transcend the hold of the body, mind, and intellect to recognize the Divine Essence within. To ensure that those who didn’t understand English could benefit from the great text, He arranged for a Malayalam translation on each day following His discourse.

An extraordinary aspect bridging the 28th and 29th Jnana Yajnas was the thoughtful cooperative effort of the two yajna committees. To enable the seekers to attend both the yajnas that were held during the same three weeks, a special motor boat was arranged to ferry them across the backwaters. From Vivekachudamani to Bhagavad Gita chapters 12 and 13, knowledge and devotion flowed seamlessly because of the generous, untiring Guru.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

All the aspirants then marched on, chanting the usual kirtans, under the guidance of Swamiji, to the Jetty, near the  Palace-grounds and went into the Special motor boat, for attending the Geeta Jnana Yajna at Mattancherry. As we were crossing the backwaters of the Arabian Sea from Ernakulam to Mattancherry, we could not help realizing how the backwaters that apparently separated the two Yagna Salas had been bridge over by the joint efforts of the two Yagna  Committees. In effect there was only one Yagna to those who attended-one single Yagna wherein daily from 5 P.M right up to 10.30 P.M we enjoyed the ceaseless roar of the Truth.

From Tyagi Magazine

The more we identify with the body, the more are our life’s botherations. Thus, holding onto an unreal thing becomes the essence of all bondage. This is the second definition of bondage. The first definition was in the previous verse where it was declared that considering the anatman to be the Self was bondage (v.137). Bondage is nothing other than the identification with the unreal, the perishable, the changeable, the variable, the mutable – together called the anatman, the not-Self.

From Vivekachudamani Book

What came first? Tree or Seed?

Constantly plagued by the timeless question that bewilders the human mind: which preceded the other, the tree or the seed? Is there a realm beyond this perplexity? Dive into the video to unveil the solution and contemplate the enigmatic depths of the cosmos.


Jnana Yajna 28

Jnana Yajna 28

Year & Dates:

March 14, 1957 to April 03, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Bhagavad Gita - Chapter 12 & 13

Place:

Mattancherry, India.

After almost two years, Mattancherry had the privilege of hosting its next Jnana Yajna. Pujya Gurudev had again chosen the right time, place, and topic for the seekers in Kerala. So, on the pleasant evening of March 14,1957, the atmosphere was jubilant inside the Diamond Jubilee Memorial Hall of the Thirumala Devaswom High School, Mattancherry. From the ancient Pazhayannur temple, the caparisoned elephant carried the pots of sacred Ganga waters, swaying to the auspicious chants of “Om Namo Narayanaya.” The Om flag fluttering in the breeze before the yajnashala seemed to reflect the joyful impatience of the yajna audience. And, one element of the inauguration was endearing and praiseworthy. A group of adorable young children trained by Smt. Janakiammal of Mattancherry Chinmaya Mission chanted the great verses of Bhagavad Gita chapter 12 in the tune that was becoming distinctly associated with Chinmaya Mission.

A Universal, Motivational Melody

Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda, reiterated that Bhagavad Gita is a “universal and perfected Science practical and applicable to one and all, under all conditions, and at all times.” He emphasized that Gita did not belong to just one religion. He noted that the magnificent portrait of the Divine Flute-Player, Bhagavan Krishna, was an apt background on the yajna stage; the Gita was an inspiring, melodic call to the entire Universe. Recommending the beauty in worship and stating how devotion elevates a devotee to selfless perfection, Pujya Gurudev motivated all to discover the Bliss of Bhakti. Explaining the knowledge embedded in chapter 13, He directed the seekers’ attention to the One Principle behind the entire field of experiences. As a special incentive to worship and know the Presence that enlivens everything, a gold medal was announced as prize for one who chanted all the verses of Gita chapters 12 & 13 in the tune special to Chinmaya Mission. 

Pujya Gurudev encouraged all to realize that Shrimad Bhagavad Gita was the most enchanting and enduring prize to win in life.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

When a devotee of the Infinite Lord surrenders himself totally at His feet and acts as a messenger, or as a representative of the Will of the Lord, he becomes, not only divinely dynamic, but in and through his own activities, aware of the Presence and Grace of the Universal Spirit. 

From Bhagavad Gita- Chapters 12 & 13, Book

The “knower-of-the-field” is the status of the Knowing-Principle when It is functioning in the “Field-of-the-Known.” Bereft of the field-of-objects, the “Knower” himself becomes nothing but “Pure Knowledge,” without the functions of knowing attached to it.

From Bhagavad Gita- Chapters 12 & 13, Book

What Enlivens Matter?

Understand the dynamic interplay between matter and spirit through the lens of Vedantic philosophy through this beautiful excerpt from Chapter 13 of Bhagavad Gita. Discover how Consciousness infuses life into the inert realm of matter, which alone guides us towards the experience of joy, sorrow or any of our experiences.


Jnana Yajna 27

Jnana Yajna 27

Year & Dates:

February 17, 1957 to March 03, 1957

Yajna Topic:

Bhagavad Gita - Chapter 16 & 17

Place:

Kolkata, India.

Devotees who gathered at the Howrah station in Kolkata (previously Calcutta) to receive Pujya Gurudev Swami Chinmayananda were in for a surprise. The familiar “bearded, Chinmaya” emerged with a smiling, clean-shaven face, wearing no shirt but only the angavastra (draping cloth) and saffron dhoti. In respectful honor of Parama Guru Swami Tapovanam’s Mahasamadhi, Pujya Gurudev had taken the vow to be shirtless for a year. His personal austerity and Guru-Bhakti added a special glow to the spirited sage. Pujya Gurudev was, for the first time, bringing out the knowledge in Chapters 16 & 17 of Shrimad Bhagavad Gita. This notable privilege delighted the large crowds of Kolkata in the 27th Jnana Yajna. 

Faith, Pure and Powerful

When Justice Ram Prosad Mukherjee unveiled the portrait of Arjuna’s despair and Bhagavan Krishna’s Celestial Song in the brimming hall of Maharashtra Niwas, it signaled a strong start to another enriching Gita Jnana Yajna. “Power is true only when supplemented by inner strength,” stressed Sri Kalidas Nag, an Indian historian and parliamentarian, in his inaugural address. With words of great power, Pujya Gurudev reminded the audience that Bhagavad Gita, the “small hand-book of instructions,” could supplement a busy marketplace with valuable virtues. He reiterated how virtues were prerequisites for entering the portals of Vedanta and that Gita did not rush to condemn the morally-fallen or commend the virtuous. The 16th chapter scientifically presented the ways an embodied self behaves in the physical, mental, and intellectual planes of experiences – disciplined or indisciplined. Then, Pujya Gurudev asserted the importance of faith in all aspects of human efforts as elucidated by Bhagavan Krishna in the 17th chapter. Pure and noble intentions fueled by deep faith can transform any venture into a spiritual victory – so taught Pujya Gurudev as His Gita Jnana Yajnas stood testimony to His unflinching faith in the Highest.

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“Think,” Says Pujya Gurudev 

To a seeker, living the ethical values, is in itself, a kind of treatment to cure him of some of his personality-diseases. To the Hindus, a sinner is not a dangerous mental leper or a failure of the omnipotent Lord. To a Vedantin, satan is not a perpetual challenge to God. The good, contaminated by weakness and ignorance, is the evil. And the evil, when cured of ignorance, itself becomes the good.”

From Bhagavad Gita- Chapters 16 & 17, Book

Shraddha determines the texture of our impressions in us, which in turn commands our view of life. Our desires, thoughts, and actions are charted by our view of life. Naturally, an individual’s physical activities, psychological behaviors, and intellectual makeup are all ordered by the type of Sraddha he has come to maintain in himself…As his inner disposition, so the man.

From Bhagavad Gita- Chapters 16 & 17, Book

If you have these, you are Wealthy!

In this enlightening excerpt inspired by the teachings of the Bhagavad Gita, delve into the essence of inner wealth and its significance in shaping one’s character and achievements. Explore the six essential qualities—Teja (Vigour), Kshama (Forgiveness), Dhriti (Consistency), Shaucham (Cleanliness), Adroha (Non-Cruelty), and Na-Atimanita (Humility)—that constitute the foundation of inner wealth. Discover how nurturing these qualities empowers individuals to overcome challenges, maintain resilience, and ultimately achieve success, both inwardly and outwardly.